Tuesday, October 17, 2017

2018 Chemistry Faculty Jobs List: 354 positions

The 2018 Chemistry Faculty Jobs List (curated by Andrew Spaeth and myself) has 354 positions.

Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions.

Want to talk anonymously? Have an update on the status of a job search? Try the open thread.

On October 17, 2016, the 2017 Chemistry Faculty Jobs List had 401 positions.

Otherwise, all discussions are on the Chemistry Faculty Jobs List webforum.

The Academic Staff Jobs List: 31 positions

The Academic Staff Jobs list has 31 positions.

This list is curated by Sarah Cady. It targets:
  • Full-time STAFF positions in a Chem/Biochem/ChemE lab/facility at an academic institution/natl lab
  • Lab Coordinator positions for research groups or undergraduate labs 
  • and for an institution in Canada or the United States
Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions.

Want to chat about staff scientist positions? Try the open thread.

15 new positions at Organic Chemistry Jobs

Over at Common Organic Chemistry, there's 15 new positions posted for Sunday, October 15.

Monday, October 16, 2017

Interesting writing opportunity

From the Division of Organic Chemistry newsletter:
Organic Chemistry Writers Wanted
C&EN BrandLab produces sponsored content on the behalf of advertisers in Chemical & Engineering News. The custom content studio is seeking freelance writers with credentials in organic chemistry who can tell compelling, engaging stories with a sharp eye for technical accuracy. If you'd like to write for C&EN BrandLab, please get in touch with C&EN BrandLab’s executive editor, Raj Mukhopadhyay, at r_mukhopadhyay [at] acs [dot] org.
Best wishes to those interested. 

Friday, October 13, 2017

Radio show: Mary Boyd, Berry College provost



Looking forward to talking with Dr. Mary Boyd, provost of Berry College, on Saturday, October 14 at 9 AM Eastern:

Questions for the audience:
  • Got a resume that you'd like us to review live on the air? We will actually do this (discreetly/anonymously, of course)
  • Got a cover letter that you'd like us to review live on the air? (discreetly/anonymously, of course)
  • How is the academic market these days?
  • Tips for a smooth phone/Skype interview
  • Tips for a good interview
What would you like us to cover? Some topics will be pre-chosen, some are up to you.

Job posting: LC/MS research scientist, Aegis, Nashville, TN

From the inbox, a position with Aegis Laboratories:
The Research Scientist is responsible for developing new methods and improving existing processes for the Aegis Laboratories.
Essential Duties & Responsibilities:
  • Develop improved analytical methods for a variety of instrumentation including the following:
    • Triple TOF
    • GC-MS/MS
    • LC-MS/MS
    • Other new technologies as required
  • Continued development of:
    • Small molecule method development 
    • Analytical Methods with Clinical Applications 
  • Discuss research results with technical staff..
Successful Candidates Must Possess:
  • A Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical, Analytical Chemistry, Medicinal Chemistry, or Toxicology Sciences required
  • A minimum of two (2) years of relevant experience in analytical method development utilizing GC/MS, LC/MS/MS instrumentation required
  • Experience in forensic analysis desired
Full listing here. Best wishes to those interested. 

Squeeze bottles of toluene

A list of small, useful things (links):
Again, an open invitation to all interested in writing a blog, a hobby that will bring you millions thousands hundreds tens of dollars joy and happiness. Send me a link to your post, and I'd be happy to put it up.

The most doom-y quote you're gonna read today

Via the New York Times' David Leonhardt: 
By 2019, G.D.P. per working-age adult is likely to be only 11 percent higher than when the crisis began (barring an unexpected growth surge or a recession). That’s a miserable growth rate over an extended period. Yes, the economy has done fairly well for last year or two, but not nearly well enough to make up for the long slump, especially because growth was also mediocre in the early 2000s. No wonder so many Americans are angry and frustrated.
I have no answers, only more questions.  

Thursday, October 12, 2017

The Medicinal Chemist Jobs List: 127 positions

The Medicinal Chemist Jobs list has 127 positions.

Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions, but if you want to do the traditional "leave a link in the comments", that works, too.

Want to chat about medchem positions? Try the open thread.

Positions I'm not including: positions outside the United States, computational positions (this will likely change), academic positions (likely never.)

The Process Chemistry Jobs List: 73 positions

The Process Chemistry Jobs List has 73 positions.

Want to chat process jobs? Try the open thread. 

How did the Kobe Steel faking happen?

Doubtless you've heard about this, but in case you haven't, via the New York Times (article by Jonathan Soble and Neal E. Boudette) 
TOKYO — Big manufacturers of cars, aircraft and bullet trains have long relied on Kobe Steel to provide raw materials for their products, making the steel maker a crucial, if largely invisible, pillar of the Japanese economy. 
Now, Kobe Steel has acknowledged falsifying data about the quality of aluminum and copper it sold, setting off a scandal that is reverberating through the global supply chain and casting a new shadow over the country’s reputation for precision manufacturing... 
...Kobe Steel said on Sunday that employees at four of its factories had altered inspection certificates on aluminum and copper products from September 2016 to August this year. The changes, it said, made it look as if the products met manufacturing specifications required by customers — including for vital qualities like tensile strength, a measure of material’s ability to withstand a load without breaking when being stretched — when they did not. 
On Wednesday, the company said it was investigating possible data falsification involving another product, powdered steel, which is used mostly to make gears. The company said the powdered steel it was examining had been sold to one customer it did not name...
So here's what I want to know - how the heck was this not caught by the customers? Is metallurgy different than chemistry? Did customers only rely on Kobe Steel's testing? (Do they not have their own QC labs?) Man, that's remarkable if so.

(Of course, how often did you QC stuff from Aldrich in grad school? Rarely, if ever, for me.) 

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Talking with Mary Boyd, Berry College provost

Looking forward to talking with Dr. Mary Boyd, provost of Berry College, on Saturday, October 14 at 9 AM Eastern:

Questions for the audience:
  • Got a resume that you'd like us to review live on the air? We will actually do this (discreetly/anonymously, of course)
  • Got a cover letter that you'd like us to review live on the air? (discreetly/anonymously, of course)
  • How is the market these days? 
What would you like us to cover? Some topics will be pre-chosen, some are up to you. 

2018 Chemistry Faculty Jobs List: 331 positions

The 2018 Chemistry Faculty Jobs List (curated by Andrew Spaeth and myself) has 331 positions.

Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions.

Want to talk anonymously? Have an update on the status of a job search? Try the open thread.

Otherwise, all discussions are on the Chemistry Faculty Jobs List webforum.

The Academic Staff Jobs List: 28 positions

The Academic Staff Jobs list has 28 positions.

This list is curated by Sarah Cady. It targets:
  • Full-time STAFF positions in a Chem/Biochem/ChemE lab/facility at an academic institution/natl lab
  • Lab Coordinator positions for research groups or undergraduate labs 
  • and for an institution in Canada or the United States
Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions.

Want to chat about staff scientist positions? Try the open thread.

Monday, October 9, 2017

8 new positions at Organic Chemistry Jobs

Over at Common Organic Chemistry, there's 8 new positions posted for Sunday, October 8.  

The extraction of rare earths

I really enjoyed this letter to the editor about the initial discovery of rare earths at the Ames Laboratory: 
The recent article about rare earths (C&EN, Aug. 28, page 30) reminded me of my work at Ames during the early 1950s. From 1951 to 1953, I worked for Frank Spedding, who was director of both Iowa State University’s Institute for Atomic Research and the Ames Laboratory of the Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy). His earlier work in support of the Manhattan Project is well-known. In addition, his interest in the chemistry of rare earths led to the development of ion-exchange procedures that made it possible for us to produce some of the first multigram quantities of high-purity rare-earth oxides by a relatively simple process. 
Our first work was with 1-inch-diameter, 48-inch-long [2.54-cm-diameter, 121.92-cm-long] glass columns filled with Dowex-50 resin. The distribution of the resin in the columns and the elution rates required careful control to maintain horizontal boundaries between the rare earths as they moved down the column. 
Initially, the eluant was collected at a drops-per-minute rate into 10-mL flasks, and one of us was in attendance 24 hours a day to change flasks and to make sure no problems occurred. When it was established that high-purity material was being obtained by the procedure, some was converted into metal by Harley Wilhelm in the lab’s metallurgy facility. By 1953 the columns had grown to 8 inches [20.32 cm] in diameter and 10 feet [3.05 meters] in length, and proportionally more rare earths were being produced. 
Even then we had no sense of the elements’ future importance, and it is interesting to read of their many applications today. 
(The picture of colored rare earth oxides in the article could also have included erbium, which is pink, as I recall.) 
Jack L. Evans
Sun Lakes, Ariz.
It's kinda funny and weird to me that fraction collectors were not available, even in the early 1950s. Nevertheless, pretty cool.  

This week's C&EN

A few articles from this week's issue of Chemical and Engineering News:

Last week's C&EN

A few articles from last week's issue of Chemical and Engineering News:

Friday, October 6, 2017

Radio show: Saturday, October 7, noon Eastern with Lisa Balbes



Looking forward to talking with Dr. Lisa Balbes (of Balbes Consultants LLC, and author of the excellent "Nontraditional Careers for Chemists: New Formulas for Chemistry Careers") on Saturday, October 7 at noon Eastern.

Questions for the audience:
  • Got a resume that you'd like us to review live on the air? We will actually do this (discreetly, of course)
  • Got a cover letter that you'd like us to review (anonymously) live on the air?
  • How is the market these days?
  • What would you like us to cover? Some topics will be pre-chosen (e.g. How Do You Define A Chemist?), some are up to you.
Leave suggestions in the comments, or e-mail me: chemjobber@gmail.com

Show notes: 

View From Your Hood: Texas clouds edition

Credit: A long time lurker
A submission from a long time lurker of the view from the University of Texas Health Science Center.

(got a View from Your Hood submission? Send it in (with a caption and preference for name/anonymity, please) at chemjobber@gmail.com; will run every other Friday.)

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Radio show: Saturday, October 7, noon Eastern with Lisa Balbes

Looking forward to talking with Dr. Lisa Balbes (of Balbes Consultants LLC, and author of the excellent "Nontraditional Careers for Chemists: New Formulas for Chemistry Careers") on Saturday, October 7 at noon Eastern.

Questions for the audience:
  • Got a resume that you'd like us to review live on the air? We will actually do this (discreetly, of course)
  • Got a cover letter that you'd like us to review (anonymously) live on the air? 
  • How is the market these days? 
  • What would you like us to cover? Some topics will be pre-chosen (e.g. How Do You Define A Chemist?), some are up to you. 
Leave suggestions in the comments, or e-mail me: chemjobber@gmail.com

The Medicinal Chemist Jobs List: 124 positions

The Medicinal Chemist Jobs list has 124 positions.

Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions, but if you want to do the traditional "leave a link in the comments", that works, too.

Want to chat about medchem positions? Try the open thread.

Positions I'm not including: positions outside the United States (this will likely change), computational positions (this will likely change as well), academic positions (likely never.)

The Process Chemistry Jobs List: 68 positions

The Process Chemistry Jobs List has 68 positions.

Want to chat process jobs? Try the open thread. 

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Hilarious interview with new Nobel Laureate Jeffrey C. Hall



I bet anything this is the first Nobel Laureate to have been interviewed while wearing a "Brawndo" hat.

Tuesday, October 3, 2017

2018 Chemistry Faculty Jobs List: 317 positions

The 2018 Chemistry Faculty Jobs List (curated by Andrew Spaeth and myself) has 317 positions.

Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions.

Want to talk anonymously? Try the open thread.

Otherwise, all discussions are on the Chemistry Faculty Jobs List webforum.

The Academic Staff Jobs List: 27 positions

The Academic Staff Jobs list has 27 positions.

This list is curated by Sarah Cady. It targets:
  • Full-time STAFF positions in a Chem/Biochem/ChemE lab/facility at an academic institution/natl lab
  • Lab Coordinator positions for research groups or undergraduate labs 
  • and for an institution in Canada or the United States
Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions.

Want to chat about staff scientist positions? Try the open thread.

Monday, October 2, 2017

ACS Presidential Candidate Bonnie Charpentier on #chemjobs issues

I recently sent an e-mail to Dr. Bonnie Charpentier, who is currently running for the ACS President-Elect position to see if she was interested in answering last year's questions for ACS presidential candidates.

She responded today. Her unedited response is below:

1. Which ACS program do you think best helps the job-seeking ACS member? How would you improve it?
The most complete resource for ACS members is Career Navigator, which provides a menu of different programs and tools for job-seekers and others interested in exploring career options and professional development. Options under career navigator include offerings such as resume writing, career consulting, professional education courses and links to information about salaries and survey results. One way it could be improved by making sure that members know about it.
I think some of our strongest programs involve member-to-member connections and communication. More and more jobs are in small companies, and according to information in the press, including an article in the New York Times, a large percentage of jobs are obtained through referrals. Most of those jobs are not advertised at venues such as national meetings nor in C&EN. We could make it easier for members to share information about opportunities broadly with each other online through ACS.

2. Is it ACS policy to get more students to study in STEM fields, specifically chemistry? If so, how do we reconcile the fact that wages for chemists are stagnant? Does this argue against the idea of a STEM shortage and the need for more STEM students?
ACS has a policy titled “Strengthen Science Education and the Scientific Workforce” which, among other things, calls for strengthening support for science education facilities and teacher education and training, supports nurturing students of all backgrounds in pursuit of studies and careers in STEM, and urges Congress to reduce the complexity of 401(k) plans available to small business owners. The policy can be found at https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/policy/publicpolicies/education.html
I personally am a strong advocate for strengthening STEM education everywhere for all students to make them more informed as consumers and as the electorate. The advantages of a scientifically literate public are numerous and important.
I believe we should provide information to students about potential career paths and provide as accurate information as we can about job prospects in different fields of STEM. Education in STEM can be useful in many different types of jobs and professions. The caveat is that where the jobs are (both geographically and technically) changes over time. I believe students should pursue what interests them and what they love, with as clear an understanding of relevant job prospects as possible.
The wages for chemists and other STEM professionals are affected by many complex economic factors, and scientific and technical skills are needed in many areas. What we can do for our members is identify areas where those skills are needed, provide training to help us all stay current technically and develop additional important non-technical skills to improve job prospects.

3. In the past decade, what was the one action of any ACS President that has had the greatest influence - good or bad - on members' employment and careers? Other than working groups and reports, what tangible steps would you take to increase the number of chemistry jobs in the US, and is this something you think is really achievable?
To be successful, any program to influence members’ careers must be sustainable and supported by the actions of more than one individual. All recent ACS presidents have sought to address employment issues for chemists; including, as noted in the question, multiple task forces and reports, some of which provided useful insights. In my industry career I have had to deal with lay-offs and site closures, and I know firsthand that employment statistics showing things are better for chemists than in some other fields don’t mean much to an individual who can’t find a job.

On the negative side, it seems unlikely that large corporations in traditional areas will change the pattern of down-sizing and layoffs we have become accustomed to seeing. On the positive side, advances in many new areas of technology require the skills of chemists. Chemists are creating jobs for chemists in start-ups and small businesses. We can advocate strongly for policies that incentivize job creation in chemistry and other fields that are vital to our overall economy and well-being, and that is something I would pursue with vigor. ACS has recently been bringing together CTO’s from big companies for discussions; we can do more to work with small companies and start-ups, and to encourage collaboration between academia and industry.

4. One of the chief roles of the ACS is to advocate for chemists in the US Congress. Which of the following options would you prioritize, and why? (increased grant funding, more training in entrepreneurship for students, shifting funding from academia to more SBIRs or retraining postdocs?)

Having spent time on Capitol Hill advocating for chemists and funding for science and education, and in my current job, walking the Hill with patients and patient advocates regarding rare diseases, one thing I’ve learned is that it is more effective to advocate for actions that have understandable human consequences than for esoteric concepts. (Another thing I’ve learned is that it can be more effective to talk with senators and representatives in their home districts than on the Hill, but that is another topic).

My priority would be to advocate for funding for science and technology with clear and concrete examples of the importance of that funding to the discovery and development of such things as medicines, energy sources, clean water, new technologies and the importance to our lives and economic well-being. In this time of bitter partisanship, focusing on areas of concrete importance to constituents is one way toward bi-partisan support. I don’t see this as a question of shifting funding from academia to more SBIRs; both are important, and both can be supported by solid and reliable funding, as can grants and educational programs.

5. It has been 8 years since the official end of the Great Recession. What should ACS be doing to prepare our members for the next recession? 
The most obvious answer is to help our members maintain marketable technical and soft skills through continuing education, leadership, and entrepreneurial training. These are important at any time, but clearly more critical in economic downturns. Our programs must be kept strong, relevant and effective for our members. The ability for members to network and support each other with employment information is also important.
A less obvious answer is that to do these things ACS must be sustainable. In my opinion, we could have done a better job with some decision-making during the last recession. After that experience, plans were put in place to establish clear priorities and financial contingencies and it is very important that ACS keep those plans current in the event of another recession to enable the financial sustainability of the Society and services for members.

Thanks to Dr. Charpentier for her responses. 

Friday, September 29, 2017

24/40 ground glass joints

A small list of useful things (links):
Again, an open invitation to all interested in writing a blog, a hobby that will bring you millions thousands hundreds tens of dollars joy and happiness. Send me a link to your post, and I'd be happy to put it up.

Have a good weekend! 

ACS Presidential Candidate Willie E. May on #chemjobs issues

I recently sent an e-mail to Dr. Willie E. May, who is currently running for the ACS President-Elect position to see if he was interested in answering last year's questions for ACS presidential candidates.

He responded yesterday. His unedited response is below:

1. Which ACS program do you think best helps the job-seeking ACS member? How would you improve it?
Interview and resume review workshops for chemists at any stage of their careers as well as programs for aspiring entrepreneurs are among the many valuable ACS programs for job-seekers. ACS appears to have made considerable effort to address unemployment among chemists, which is important, especially if weak spots develop in the market ahead.

ACS should put more energy into assisting the young people – who we are encouraging to pursue chemical science careers – to find gainful employment.

I was informed just last week of a staff reorganization intended to strengthen ACS job and career programs for members. I would like to get additional details before commenting further; it is probably prudent to allow time to see the impact of these changes and I pledge to track these changes.
2. Is it ACS policy to get more students to study in STEM fields, specifically chemistry? If so, how do we reconcile the fact that wages for chemists are stagnant? Does this argue against the idea of a STEM shortage and the need for more STEM students?
ACS policies are based on a recognition that the contributions of chemical scientists and engineers are essential in solving many of the world's pressing challenges. So there always will be a need for the best and brightest who want to be part of global solutions to become chemists and other scientists at the interface of chemistry. Unemployment of ACS members is still below the national average and dropped to 2.6%. Unfortunately, the salaries of many professionals have been stagnant. As ACS President-Elect, I would work tirelessly to help chemists get the best possible training for the available jobs and I would seek additional opportunities to promote and sustain the livelihoods of chemical science and technology professionals. I consider this to be a primary area of responsibility for ACS and the ACS President-Elect.
3. In the past decade, what was the one action of any ACS President that has had the greatest influence - good or bad - on members' employment and careers? Other than working groups and reports, what tangible steps would you take to increase the number of chemistry jobs in the US, and is this something you think is really achievable?
ACS has come a long way over the past decade in seeking to boost employment and careers of chemists, and the Society’s members, in particular. That’s because all our Presidents have endeavored to strengthen our organization and move programs and policies forward with respect to career enhancements for chemical scientists, engineers, technologists and administrative professionals. ACS also has an opportunity, that I would pursue, to raise awareness of and appreciation for the contributions that chemists can make in solving our society’s problems and advancing growth through innovative approaches.  See my candidate statement at: http://cenm.ag/willie-e-may and my website at: williemayacs.com for my ideas about building on this past work.
 4. One of the chief roles of the ACS is to advocate for chemists in the US Congress. Which of the following options would you prioritize, and why? (increased grant funding, more training in entrepreneurship for students, shifting funding from academia to more SBIRs or retraining postdocs?)
If elected, I would work with the ACS Board Committee tasked with advocacy and ACS staff to advance these three goals while regularly re-examining our priorities.  
5. It has been 8 years since the official end of the Great Recession. What should ACS be doing to prepare our members for the next recession? 
It is very wise for ACS – and chemists, more broadly – to prepare for both economic growth as well as less favorable developments. ACS has worked with many groups to ensure chemists are flexible and well trained for the future. As noted above, I would work to further enhance those programs. 

Thanks to Dr. May for his responses. Dr. Charpentier will have her responses published within 24 to 48 hours after it has been received.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

The Medicinal Chemist Jobs List: 117 positions

The Medicinal Chemist Jobs list has 117 positions.

Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions, but if you want to do the traditional "leave a link in the comments", that works, too.

Want to chat about medchem positions? Try the open thread.

Positions I'm not including: positions outside the United States (this will likely change), computational positions (this will likely change as well), academic positions (likely never.)

The Process Chemistry Jobs List: 62 positions

The Process Chemistry Jobs List has 62 positions.

Want to chat process jobs? Try the open thread. 

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Quote of the day: getting decisions made

From Melanie Nelson's TinyLetter, a very good set of thoughts about decision making: 
...To keep projects on track, you have to know how to get decisions made. That is something that sounds simple but can be quite tricky, because what "knowing how to get decisions made" really means is "knowing what the decision maker needs to make a decision." This is not always obvious, even when the decision maker is yourself. I eventually realized that I needed some expert advice to make this decision, and now I have it.  
Based on that advice, I know I need to do a little more information gathering. Then, I'll need to mull it over for awhile (preferably while walking) and then by some magical internal process, I'll have a decision I feel good about. This fits my usual decision making process, which is "gather all the information and advice and let it stew a bit until my brain works out what to do." I'd tried to skip the "get expert advice" and "gather information" steps, and all the mulling in the world wasn't going to get me a decision without doing those steps.
It's funny to watch veteran decision makers make their decisions, because they won't even consider making decisions without the facts that they deem necessary. 

Warning Letter of the Week: honest QA manager editions

A love note from the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research to the general manager of Shandong Vianor Biotech Co., Ltd:
2.    Your firm failed to establish an adequate quality control unit with the responsibility and authority to approve or reject all components, drug product containers, closures, in-process materials, packaging materials, labeling, and drug products (21 CFR 211.22(a)). 
Your laboratory analysis revealed that [redacted] lot [redacted] was subpotent. However, the certificate of analysis (CoA) provided showed that it was within specification. When questioned about why the CoA reported passing results even though the batch actually failed, your quality unit manager stated, “I made a mistake.”

3.    Your firm failed to clean, maintain, and, as appropriate for the nature of the drug, sanitize and/or sterilize equipment and utensils at appropriate intervals to prevent malfunctions or contamination that would alter the safety, identity, strength, quality, or purity of the drug product beyond the official or other established requirements (21 CFR 211.67(a)).

Our investigator observed what appeared to be rusted and corroded screws, [redacted] fluid and debris, and metallic mesh material on the product contact surfaces of [redacted] located in your facility.

Access to information during inspection
During the inspection, you initially barred our investigator from accessing a room identified as a laboratory. You eventually allowed the investigator to inspect the laboratory, but he found that it contained no equipment. You then stated that the laboratory was offsite at a [redacted] residence and that you could not give our investigator access as it was not a convenient time.
I think "I made a mistake" was a new one for a warning letter.  

EdX class in medicinal chemistry

From the inbox, Professor Erland Stevens of Davidson College is once again teaching his class on medicinal chemistry:
A free, seven-week course on medicinal chemistry starts on Monday, October 2nd on the edX platform. The course is offered as a collaboration between Davidson College and the Novartis Institutes of BioMedical Research. Nearly 50,000 students have enrolled for the past five instances of the course. 
The course covers the major topics of medicinal chemistry, including drug approval, common drug targets (enzymes and receptors), pharmacokinetics (half-life, clearance, volume of distribution), metabolism, lead discovery, and lead optimization.  The course also includes both weekly interviews with pharmaceutical professionals (many from Novartis) and lab exercises highlighting online tools for drug discovery. 
Any student who can read organic structures and identify functional groups should fine in terms of prerequisites (bio/chem/math).  Students who complete the course will be well equipped to listen to and follow a drug discovery talk presented at a conference or university.
Best wishes to those interested.  

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

2018 Chemistry Faculty Jobs List: 296 positions

The 2018 Chemistry Faculty Jobs List (curated by Andrew Spaeth and myself) has 296 positions.

Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions.

Want to talk anonymously? Try the open thread.

Otherwise, all discussions are on the Chemistry Faculty Jobs List webforum.

The Academic Staff Jobs List: 25 positions

The Academic Staff Jobs list has 25 positions.

This list is curated by Sarah Cady. It targets:
  • Full-time STAFF positions in a Chem/Biochem/ChemE lab/facility at an academic institution/natl lab
  • Lab Coordinator positions for research groups or undergraduate labs 
  • and for an institution in Canada or the United States
Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions.

Want to chat about staff scientist positions? Try the open thread. 

Daily Pump Trap: 9/26/17 edition

A few of the industrial positions posted at C&EN Jobs:

Adrian, MI: Wacker is searching for silicone materials research chemist; M.S./Ph.D. desired.

Nashville, TN: Aegis is looking for a Ph.D. analytical chemist.

Buffalo, NY: DuPont is looking for an experienced polymer/organic chemist for a research investigator position.

Basel, Switzerland: Head of Catalysis for Roche sounds fun.

Job link dump: 

Ivory Filter Flask: 9/26/17 edition

A few of the academic positions posted at C&EN Jobs: 

Montclair, NJ: Montclair State is hiring an assistant professor of organic chemistry.

Bozeman, MT: Montana State, looking for an assistant professor of inorganic (or bioinorganic) chemistry.

Lyngby, Denmark: The Technical University of Denmark is looking for a professor working on "Surface Physical Chemistry with emphasis on basic studies—as well as industrial applications—of surface forces and molecular design of functional polymer interfaces."

Beijing, China: Tsinghua, hiring "3 or 4" assistant professors.

Murfreesboro, TN: Middle Tennessee State is looking for an organic chemistry laboratory coordinator.

Los Angeles, CA: A UCLA-related company is looking for a postdoc:
A unique opportunity for a postdoctoral scholar is currently available at the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). Our team has joined forces with Fuzionaire Diagnostics, a Caltech spin-out company from the laboratory of Nobel Laureate Professor Bob Grubbs.... 
...The synthetic chemistry candidate for this opportunity will work on novel methods for the synthesis of [18F]PET tracers to be evaluated for clinical translation at the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging....
 $45,000 to $55,000 offered. 

Monday, September 25, 2017

ACS Publications has cancelled individual subscriptions to ACS journals

From an e-mail to ACS members:
In order to better serve you, we have changed the subscriptions options for ACS Member Universal Access. We are now offering twice as many downloads at no charge.  You can now download 50 articles or book chapters from any ACS Journal or eBook, as well as the C&EN Archives.  Articles or chapters downloaded past the first 50 will now cost $25 per article or chapter.

Your weekly subscription to C&EN magazine will of course continue with no changes, and it remains available both in print and electronically. You'll also continue to receive significant savings on open access publishing, discounts on ACS books, and special members-only pricing for Articles on Command.  However, individual subscriptions to our ACS Journals will be discontinued as of January 1st.  (emphasis CJ's) For more information about these changes, please visit www.acs.org/2018benefits.

Why are we discontinuing the purchase of ACS Journals for Members?  We continually assess the member benefits in order to make sure we are providing the most value to the broadest base of our members.  An assessment of usage behaviors among members show that not only do they require broader access to ACS's entire portfolio of journals, members also required more than the annual 25 downloads we traditionally provided.  Many members augmented this through additional purchases. By increasing the ACS Member Universal Access benefit to 50 articles per year, we can reduce the additional expense of purchasing journals for the majority of our members. 
I think it's rather odd that they cancelled the individual subscriptions. Here's the math, courtesy of Prof. Scott Silverman:
2x as many free downloads (old 25, new 50), but then price per goes from $12 to $25. New system costs more starting at 74 downloads.
I don't know how this affects people overall. I suspect there were not that many people purchasing individual subscriptions to begin with, but I suspect that smaller companies were purchasing individual subscriptions to key journals to save some money. 

How many substrates are enough for robustness?

Also in this week's C&EN, a good article by Tien Nguyen about a "robustness screen" proposed by Frank Glorius: 
...Last month, researchers at the University of Münster proposed a screening tool that could help chemists figure out in a matter of days how well their reactions might work with functional groups on various substrates. Led by Frank Glorius, the team assembled a set of 15 commercially available additives that, when introduced to a new reaction, could tell chemists how well a sampling of functional groups responds to a particular reaction (J. Org. Chem. 2017, DOI: 10.1021/acs.joc.7b01139). 
Glorius readily admits that the additives approach, which builds on a “robustness” method reported earlier by his group (Nat. Chem. 2013, DOI: 10.1038/nchem.1669), simplistically tests functional groups rather than whole substrates. So it can’t tell chemists how the size, location, or electronic nature of the functional groups in the context of the entire molecule will affect a reaction, which is information typically provided by traditional substrate scope testing...
Interesting responses:
...Responding to C&EN’s poll, Eindhoven University of Technology’s Timothy Noël says it’s a good thing that standards are on the rise. However, he says, smaller research groups may suffer because they lack the resources needed to achieve the “monster” substrate tables now seen in elite journals. Noël’s group recently published a light-catalyzed decarboxylation method with 58 substrates (ACS Catal. 2017, DOI: 10.1021/acscatal.7b03019). The work was done by one graduate student and partly by a master’s student, which required a huge effort on their part, he says. 
Uttam Tambar, a synthetic chemist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, says the strategy for evaluating substrate scope seems to have changed over the past decade or so, since he was a graduate student. “The way we were taught is every substrate in your substrates table should teach you something about the reaction,” says Tambar, whose lab has also used Glorius’s robustness screen as a time-saving measure (Nature 2017, DOI: 10.1038/nature22805). “Now it’s almost become a numbers game. People want to shock and awe you with the quantity of the substrates rather than the quality of substrates.”...
 Gotta say, a list of "this reaction doesn't work with that" from the authors would also be helpful. 

This week's C&EN

A few of this week's articles in Chemical and Engineering News:

Friday, September 22, 2017

View From Your Hood: Tower edition

Credit: St. Andrews Lynx
"One of my favourite fume hood views ever, from my former research position at Imperial. Sunlight on Queens Tower makes it look stunning."

(got a View from Your Hood submission? Send it in (with a caption and preference for name/anonymity, please) at chemjobber@gmail.com; will run every other Friday.)

C&EN seeking sources: ten years after the Great Recession

From the inbox:
C&EN is seeking sources for an upcoming feature 
Were you laid off during the Great Recession in 2007 and 2008? Or, was your career impacted in some other significant way (lost grant funding, lost employees, shuttered your business, etc.)? If so, C&EN would like to find out how you’ve been doing since then for a feature story on the 10th anniversary of the economic recession. We’re looking for chemists from industry, academia, government, and self-employment. Please e-mail Linda Wang at l_wang@acs.org if you’re willing to share your story.   
This is an important topic - I am glad to see C&EN covering it. 

Who is being hired in Big Pharma med chem and process positions these days?

A question, precipitated by a recent missive to the inbox:

What is Big Pharma looking for these days in process/med chem positions, in terms of pedigree/publications? I presume that there are some who are getting in without postdocs, and some who are being hired with postdocs - what is happening more where you are?

Readers, what say you?

Thursday, September 21, 2017

The Medicinal Chemist Jobs List: 125 positions

The Medicinal Chemist Jobs list has 125 positions.

Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions, but if you want to do the traditional "leave a link in the comments", that works, too.

Want to chat about medchem positions? Try the open thread.

Positions I'm not including: positions outside the United States (this will likely change), computational positions (this will likely change as well), academic positions (likely never.)

Is industry better at dealing with sexual harassment than academia?

I haven’t been able to express my thoughts about Linda Wang and Andrea Widener’s cover article in this week's C&EN on sexual harassment in academia. (I should note here that Linda is my editor for the Bench and Cubicle columns that I write for C&EN.)

While we're doing full disclosure here, I should note my opinions on the issue: I don't have any doubt that sexual harassment has and does happen in academia. For any particular case of academic sexual harassment that is brought to light in the public, I am much more inclined to believe the accuser who comes forward.

I thought it was a well-researched, comprehensive and gripping article that forced the reader to confront the reality of sexual harassment in the chemical sciences. Each story demonstrated the impact of sexual harassment:  a woman student who is harassed by an male adviser will find themselves isolated, confused, doubting themselves, unable to communicate these issues easily with confidants, potentially ashamed to go their family and they will face a departmental structure that is incentivized to have that student disappear.

What I am most struck by in the article is the pervasive sense that academic departments and universities will continue to self-police. In my humble opinion, no academic process outside of a court of law can deliver a just outcome. After watching the UC system defend Professor Patrick Harran against the Los Angeles District Attorney to the tune of millions of dollars, does anyone think that universities will step up for those at the bottom of the academic hierarchy? I am not really one that is inclined to legislative solutions to problems, but I am certainly tempted by the article's mention of Rep. Speier's bill that would require substantiated cases of harassers to be reported to the funding agencies. If it's a bad idea, it's a useful one that will introduce some threat of accountability into the system.

Something that I was surprised at was this statement from "Elizabeth":
"Some people think industry is where the harassment happens,” Elizabeth says. “But in industry, creeps get fired."
On Twitter, there were a number of people who found this statement worthy of some skepticism.

I am certainly skeptical as well, but I think that it depends on what she meant by "industry." For the 40% of Americans who work at companies with more than 1000 employees, I have no doubt that HR departments (and the lawyers that birthed them) fundamentally expect and enforce a zero-tolerance perspective on issues of sexual harassment. For smaller companies? I also have no doubt that there are well-run shops where sexual harassment is not welcome, and there are some (many?) that probably have terrible cultures.

So I am inviting industrial readers: do you think sexual harassment happens less in industry? If so, why? (My guess: the power differential between employer and employee is never quite the gulf that it is between PI and student.)

The Process Chemistry Jobs List: 54 positions

The Process Chemistry Jobs List has 54 positions.

Want to chat process jobs? Try the open thread. 

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

"Psssst, hey kid"

"Got some postdocs, too." 

Nominate a colleague for the prestigious National Chemical Technician Award

From the inbox:
Do you know an outstanding chemical technician who deserves special recognition? If so, please consider nominating that person for the 2018 National Chemical Technician Award.

Nominees must be currently employed as a chemical technician, and must have worked as a chemical technician for at least five years. Technicians hold a range of titles, including process operator, laboratory analyst, technologist, and research associate.

Nominees, who do not need to be ACS members, will be judged on their contributions in the following areas: technical achievement, leadership and mentoring, publications, presentations, patents, quality and safety practices, and professional and community activities.

Nomination packets must be received by the ACS Committee on Technician Affairs by Oct. 18, 2017.

The 2018 recipient will receive a $1000 honorarium, plaque, and a trip to the ACS national meeting in New Orleans, where he or she will be honored at a special luncheon on Sunday, March 18, 2018. 
For more information or to nominate someone, visit www.acs.org/ncta. Send questions to cta@acs.org.
Best wishes to those interested.  

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

2018 Chemistry Faculty Jobs List: 268 positions

The 2018 Chemistry Faculty Jobs List (curated by Andrew Spaeth and myself) has 268 positions.

Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions.

Want to talk anonymously? Try the open thread.

Otherwise, all discussions are on the Chemistry Faculty Jobs List webforum.

Faculty position: assistant professor of physical chemistry, Whitman College, Walla Walla, WA

The Chemistry Department of Whitman College invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in Physical Chemistry, effective August 2018. The successful candidate will exhibit potential for excellence in teaching and will establish an undergraduate research program in physical chemistry. The successful candidate will offer courses in physical chemistry and general chemistry and will also contribute to the College’s general education requirement, with an annual teaching load of five courses. Additional duties include advising and mentoring students and participating in faculty governance at the department and college level. Whitman College is a highly selective liberal arts school that values both teaching and scholarship, offers a generous sabbatical program, and provides support for professional development, start-up funds, and benefits. 
Candidates must have a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry. Postdoctoral experience and/or additional teaching experience is highly recommended.
Full ad here. Best wishes to those interested.  

The Academic Staff Jobs List: initial post and open thread

The Academic Staff Jobs list has 18 positions.

This list is curated by Sarah Cady. It targets:
  • Full-time STAFF positions in a Chem/Biochem/ChemE lab/facility at an academic institution/natl lab
  • Lab Coordinator positions for research groups or undergraduate labs 
  • and for an institution in Canada or the United States
Want to help out? Here's a Google Form to enter positions.that works, too.

Want to chat about staff scientist positions? This post will serve as the open thread.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Sexual harassment in academia

In this week's C&EN, a cover story by Linda Wang and Andrea Widener on sexual harassment: 
It started innocently enough. He was a prominent chemistry professor at a major research university, and she was eager to make a good impression. “I was a pretty insecure grad student in my early years, and the fact that he was paying attention to me and interested in my work and how I was doing in his class was kind of flattering,” says Tara (not her real name). 
The professor was not her adviser. Nevertheless, “He invited me to lunch a few times and just sought me out quite a bit. And then he invited me over to his house to watch a movie. He didn’t do anything inappropriate. But after that night, I was like, ‘Something’s weird here; he has a family.’ And his family was away for the weekend.” 
Those seemingly innocent actions became increasingly inappropriate. “The culmination was when he wrote me a love note. It was a proposition note, I guess. It basically said he wanted to have an affair with me. I stormed into his office and said, ‘You’ve got to be kidding me. This is offensive. I thought you were hanging out with me because I was talented.’ ” 
After that incident, Tara went out of her way to avoid the professor. “It was really hard,” she says, in part because his office was along the hallway she traversed between her lab and desk. Yet she didn’t report the situation to anyone. “I felt guilty, like I had somehow done something to have brought this on,” she says. 
Tara’s story is a common one in university chemistry departments nationwide, echoing the problems of sexual harassment in the larger science community and the nation. While chemistry hasn’t had a sexual harassment case come to national prominence yet, most female chemists can tell stories of harassment or discrimination of themselves or their colleagues. It may be among the reasons women aren’t reaching parity in chemistry Ph.D. programs and faculty positions. 
“It was one of the many factors why I ultimately was unsatisfied and uncomfortable in science,” says Tara, who completed her Ph.D. but decided to leave chemistry and is now working in an unrelated field....
Read the whole thing.

Friday, September 15, 2017

5 inch Draeger tubes

A list of small, useful things (links):
Again, an open invitation to all interested in writing a blog, a hobby that will bring you millions thousands hundreds tens of dollars joy and happiness. Send me a link to your post, and I'd be happy to put it up.

The best skills gap article you will read this week

From Crain's Chicago Business, just a fantastic statistical and anecdotal flaying of the supposed skills gap (emphases mine): 
...But when demand for workers spikes, wages climb, too. Except for a handful of job titles, there isn't much wage inflation in Chicago manufacturing. 
The median manufacturing worker in the Chicago metro area saw wages rise 5 percent from 2012 to 2016 to $33,000 a year, even as wages for all occupations rose 6.9 percent in that period. The average 151,000 U.S. manufacturing workers quitting their jobs each month in 2016, presumably to take higher-paying jobs, was still 27 percent lower than the number quitting before the recession. Taken together, the data suggest that employers aren't so desperate for talent that they're willing to raise wages. 
Yet the companies that have the easiest time attracting candidates are the ones that pay the most, says Anne Edmunds, regional vice president at staffing firm Manpower Group... 
...Employers may not be able to afford to raise wages if they aren't making a high-margin product, or if they need to invest in new machinery, says Jim Nelson, vice president for external affairs at the Illinois Manufacturers' Association. 
Anyway, higher pay won't improve the quality of applicants. Job-seekers need 10th-grade math and reading skills—"Too many people apply for manufacturing jobs who are unable to read a blueprint"—and they need to pass a drug test and show up on time. "Manufacturing is not the consolation prize for an occupation," he says. "It is a high-skilled, rewarding career." 
Except it's a career that in Chicago has a median annual wage of $32,860. That's higher than other occupations that draw from a similar worker pool, like janitorial services or low-skilled health care like home health aides. But unlike in manufacturing, wages in those fields have grown 10 to 15 percent in recent years to roughly $27,000.
It's a good article - read the whole thing.

Daily Pump Trap: 9/15/17 edition

A few positions posted recently at C&EN Jobs:

Topeka, KS: The Kansas Health & Environmental Laboratories are searching for an ion chromatograph chemist. $19.16 hourly; can vary depending upon experience and qualifications. B.S. desired.

Washington D.C.: Applications are being accepted for AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellowships. $75-100k offered.

Key West, FL and elsewhere: Interesting set of naval positions available with Excet. A corrosion engineer position (FL), an analytical chemist position (DC), a coating chemist position (DC) and a formulation chemist position (DC.)

Beerse (Ville), Turnhout (BE): Janssen is looking for experienced medicinal chemists for neuroscience work. Ph.D. in organic chemistry, 2-5 years experience.

Huh: Not every day you get an Indian position around these parts. Applied Materials (Mumbai, India) is looking for a M.S./Ph.D. senior chemist for semiconductor work.